Boston cleantech startup EnergySage just announced a first-of-its-kind partnership with the City of Cambridge that could signal bigger things to come.

Programs like Sunny Cambridge help position our City as a national leader in clean energy development and serve as an example for other communities across the country to replicate.

EnergySage has been described as the “Expedia of solar,” and it earned that name because it provides an online marketplace that lets homeowners and property owners compare prices of different solar panel installers, giving them a chance to find more affordable options. The company said customers can expect to pay up to 20 percent less than the market average.

The company’s new partnership with Cambridge is called Sunny Cambridge, and it gives the company a leg up in reaching more potential customers, with plans for community outreach and education. The partnership will also serve as a spearhead in the city’s “Year of Solar” campaign and help it move further in achieving its clean energy climate goals.

“Programs like Sunny Cambridge help position our City as a national leader in clean energy development and serve as an example for other communities across the country to replicate,” Richard C. Rossi, Cambridge city manager, said in a statement. In addition, the program could help the city’s chances of winning the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize.

Luke Tarbi, EnergySage’s VP of marketing, told BostInno it’s seeking this kind of partnership with other communities, and it’s already in advance conversations with over 12 cities, towns and state agencies that are looking to push solar development. The company announced last month that it has a new partnership with National Grid for customers in Rhode Island.

A program like Sunny Cambridge provides an efficient way for solar shoppers to achieve their solar installation goals.

The goal of Sunny Cambridge is to reach 100 solar installations. EnergySage takes a small commission for every sale facilitated through its marketplace, Tarbi said. For this specific partnership, it will set aside a portion of revenue that will be used for community projects in Cambridge, like installing solar panels on a church, once 75 percent of the program’s goal is reached.

“The solar energy industry has matured rapidly over the last few years, and a program like Sunny Cambridge provides an efficient way for solar shoppers to achieve their solar installation goals,” Vikram Aggarwal, founder and CEO of EnergySage, said in a statement.

EnergySage, which has 18 full-time employees, has raised $4 million, which is split between government grants and private investors like Launchpad Venture Group, The New York Angels and the Clean Energy Venture Group.