When I asked Amy Spurling, Jana’s CFO, and Sarah Matthews, the Boston startup’s associate marketing manager, about how it felt to be in a new office that had enough space for their 74 employees, there was an audible sigh of relief from both of them.

“Not having to sit in the back corner by a bathroom to take a call is phenomenal,” Spurling told me.

The startup, which provides free smartphone data usage in emerging markets as an incentive for downloading apps, recently moved out of its roughly 5,500-square-foot office on Tremont Street and into a 18,500-square-foot office on the ninth floor of 101 Arch St. in Boston, right above Localytics. The 20-story, high-rise building is also the home of ezCater and LevelUp.

Jana’s product, mCent, helps smartphone users with costly and restrictive data plans in emerging markets gain free airtime credits by downloading and trying certain apps on mCent’s marketplace. Spurling said the fact that mCent is used in 93 countries helped inform the startup’s design and layout of its new office, which is took residence last month.

“Our entire user base is in a lot of countries,” Spurling said, “so we wanted to bring some of that into the Boston space because you can kind of lose touch with who your end users are if you’re not more cognizant of the fact that what we’re doing everyday is impacting somebody’s life somewhere else.”

As Spurling and Matthews gave me a tour through their open concept office, that design decision became very apparent as I saw walls and glass door panels covered with photos of different locales, landmarks and people from across the world; images of different flags and maps; framed currencies; and clocks that have different timezones based on which country they represent.

To help Jana’s employees think about their end users across the world, each conference room and breakout room lacks a nameplate and instead has a visual representation of a city, country or currency associated with it depending on its size, Spurling said.

When scheduling rooms, employees need to know the actual name of the city, country or currency each visual represents to know which rooms are being used. The largest conference room, for instance, is called Kilifi, the town in Kenya where the idea for Jana was conceived, Matthews said.

As for the actual layout for the office, Spurling said it was arranged in a way so can decide whether to work in a space with more people or in another part of the office where that is quieter and has more breathing room. None of the employees, including the startup’s leadership team, have their own office, she said, but if they need to make a call or need to do work behind closed doors, there are 22 breakout rooms they have access to. There’s also a share of couches and other kinds of soft seating available, along with plenty of room in the office’s large cafeteria for individuals and groups to work.

“When you’re building out a floor plate that’s this big in Boston, it gets really expensive really fast,” she said, “so we focused on spending in areas that are going to have the biggest ROI for the team.”

What’s the result of Jana’s office design and layout philosophies? Take a look right here:

The entrance to Jana's office has photos of different landmarks from across the world.
The entrance to Jana’s office has photos of different landmarks from across the world.
A photo of the Church of St. Francis of Assisi in Ouro Preto, Brazil in the entrance of Jana's office.
A photo of the Church of St. Francis of Assisi in Ouro Preto, Brazil in the entrance of Jana’s office.
A nice place to sit and watch TV in Jana's lobby area.
A nice place to sit and watch TV in Jana’s lobby area.
Jana's cafeteria, where some employees have opted to work.
Jana’s cafeteria, where some employees have opted to work.
The Brazilian Real (top) and Indonesian Rupiah, currencies that represent breakout rooms on each side.
The Brazilian Real (top) and Indonesian Rupiah, currencies that represent breakout rooms on each side.
Another look at Jana's cafeteria.
Another look at Jana’s cafeteria.
These four clocks represent different geographies and timezones. From left to right: China, Brazil, Indonesia and India.
These four clocks in Jana’s cafeteria represent different geographies and timezones. From left to right: China, Brazil, Indonesia and India.
Jana's largest conference room is named Kilifi, a town in Kenya where the idea for the startup was first conceived.
Jana’s largest conference room is named Kilifi, a town in Kenya where the idea for the startup was first conceived.
A wall of sketches of Jana's employees, all drawn by the startup's product designer, Rob House.
A wall of sketches of Jana’s employees, all drawn by the startup’s product designer, Rob House.
Another look at the employee sketches.
Another look at the employee sketches.
Even more employee sketches.
Even more employee sketches.


The Mexico conference room.
The Mexico conference room.
Jana's main work area, where all desks are sitting-standing hybrids.
Jana’s main work area, where all desks are sitting-standing hybrids.
A really cool hawk figure in Jana's main work area.
A really cool hawk figure in Jana’s main work area.
This large map of Moscow is actually a secret door.
This large map of Moscow is actually a secret door.
One of the soft-seating areas. And yes, that's a British telephone booth.
One of the soft-seating areas. And yes, that’s a British telephone booth.
A photo of a man standing next to a stand selling SIM cards and smartphones in India.
A photo of a man standing next to a stand selling SIM cards and smartphones in India.
Jana's quieter office area.
Jana’s quieter office area.
Jana's wall of wigs (yeah, you probably weren't expecting that). The wigs are used for Jana's comedy night.
Jana’s wall of wigs (yeah, you probably weren’t expecting that). The wigs are used for Jana’s comedy night.
A ninja star hanger on Jana's wall of wigs.
A ninja star hanger on Jana’s wall of wigs.
The Rio de Janeiro and Philippines breakout rooms.
The Rio de Janeiro and Philippines breakout rooms.
Jana's play area.
Jana’s play area.
A Super Nintendo at a smaller play area.
A Super Nintendo at a smaller play area.

All photos taken by Dylan Martin.